Saturday, December 7, 2019

Natural disasters free essay sample

Although natural disasters are caused by nature and there is nothing that we can do to prevent them happening, there are many different natural causes that lead to natural disasters, and being aware of these causes enables us to be better prepared when such disasters do arrive. Different Types of Natural Disasters One common natural disaster is flooding, which occurs when a river bursts its banks and the water spills out onto the floodplain. This is far more likely to happen when there is a great deal of heavy rain, so during very wet periods, flood warnings are often put in place. There are other risk factors for flooding too: steep-sided channels cause fast surface run-off, while a lack of vegetation or woodland to both break the flow of water and drink the water means that there is little to slow the floodwater down. Drainage basins of impermeable rock also cause the water to run faster over the surface. Alternatives 1. Rommel, Burgin, and Neeleman should have thought of the welfare of policy owners and passengers before taking their decisions. In these situations we have to look for cause and effect relationships. 2. They should have listened to different options instead of taking the first option they had. In the three cases, the managers shaped their own decisions to reflect the organization’s performance evaluation and other systems to comply with the organization’s formal regulations and to meet organizationally imposed time constraints. They should have also thought about their clients 3. The improper response to the media had very bad influences and was very unprofessional. They should have treated the situation with more winsomely and more professionally. Evaluate Alternatives All the alternatives said above depend on personalities and their abilities of problem solving and decision-making. These elements are important skills for business, management and leadership. Some people have these skills by nature and others have to go through processes and techniques to improve their level and quality of their decisions. Recommendation Anything can affect the clients’ safety, the decisions and the choices have to be taken very carefully in favor of both clients and companies. Managers have to understand that there are events in life, like natural disasters that are outside human control, and these events require a convenient plan for both owners and clients. Also, sometimes previous organizational decisions act as precedents to constrain current decision so organizations have to try to avoid this to happen.

Friday, November 29, 2019

Roots and Stems free essay sample

Roots, stems, and leaves are the three main components of a plant. They are vital to a plant’s survival, and without them, the plant would die. Each component has a different function and varying appearances. A leaf’s main function in the plant is to produce energy through photosynthesis. They absorb sunlight and create sugar. The leaf then constantly sends energy throughout the stem, roots, and other parts of the plant. Sometimes leaves are also used for protection against animals that are a threat to the plant’s health and survival. They come in different shapes and sizes. Some are smaller and rounder than others, while some are in the shape of needles like a cactus. Leaves are essential in the obtainment of energy for plants. Stems have two primary functions in the plant. We will write a custom essay sample on Roots and Stems or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page They are needed to support the leaves, flowers, or fruit that the plant may produce, and they transport water and other nutrients in the plant. Other functions include storing carbohydrates, nutrients, and water. Rhizomes or underground stems, tubers, and bulbs are different types of stems. A sign of a healthy stem is when the stem is erect because this creates the most support for the plant. Roots are the most important feature for a plant’s health. Functions of the roots include providing anchorage, absorbing water and nutrients, and transporting the water and nutrients throughout the parts of the plant. They tend to grow away from sunlight and towards water in order to obtain the most water possible. Another important job is that they store starch which allows photosynthesis to occur. There are two types of roots: tap roots and fibrous roots. Tap roots are large, and they provide the most anchorage possible while fibrous roots are threadlike, and give the plant the most exposure to water and minerals. There are many different other parts of the plant, but these three are the most important. Without them there would be no plants, and without plants there would be no oxygen for us to breathe. The human race needs the roots, stems, and leaves to continue functioning because if they don’t, we may find ourselves facing extinction. Roots and Stems free essay sample Roots, stems, and leaves are the three main components of a plant. They are vital to a plant’s survival, and without them, the plant would die. Each component has a different function and varying appearances. A leaf’s main function in the plant is to produce energy through photosynthesis. They absorb sunlight and create sugar. The leaf then constantly sends energy throughout the stem, roots, and other parts of the plant. Sometimes leaves are also used for protection against animals that are a threat to the plant’s health and survival. They come in different shapes and sizes. Some are smaller and rounder than others, while some are in the shape of needles like a cactus. Leaves are essential in the obtainment of energy for plants. Stems have two primary functions in the plant. We will write a custom essay sample on Roots and Stems or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page They are needed to support the leaves, flowers, or fruit that the plant may produce, and they transport water and other nutrients in the plant. Other functions include storing carbohydrates, nutrients, and water. Rhizomes or underground stems, tubers, and bulbs are different types of stems. A sign of a healthy stem is when the stem is erect because this creates the most support for the plant. Roots are the most important feature for a plant’s health. Functions of the roots include providing anchorage, absorbing water and nutrients, and transporting the water and nutrients throughout the parts of the plant. They tend to grow away from sunlight and towards water in order to obtain the most water possible. Another important job is that they store starch which allows photosynthesis to occur. There are two types of roots: tap roots and fibrous roots. Tap roots are large, and they provide the most anchorage possible while fibrous roots are threadlike, and give the plant the most exposure to water and minerals. There are many different other parts of the plant, but these three are the most important. Without them there would be no plants, and without plants there would be no oxygen for us to breathe. The human race needs the roots, stems, and leaves to continue functioning because if they don’t, we may find ourselves facing extinction.

Monday, November 25, 2019

Free Essays on Mythology

Greek mythology was fully developed by about the 8th century BC. As the Greek people began to realize that the sun, moon and stars followed certain rhythms with The seasons, they thought that something not beast nor human had the power. That is were the idea of gods came in. Ancient Greeks believed that the gods, who resembled Humans lived on Mount Olympus, where they had their own little society. Individual Gods were part of three main parts of the world- the sky or heaven, the sea, and the Earth. The 12 chief gods were Zeus was the god of the sky and ruler of the Olympian gods. He was considered the father of the gods, and of mortals, although he did not create either; he was their father in the sense of being the ruler both of the Olympian gods and of the human race. He was the rain god, and the cloud gatherer, his wepon was the terrible thunderbolt. His breastplate was the aegis, his bird the eagle, his tree the oak. Zeus was the youngest son of the Titans, Cronus and Rhea, and the brother of the Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter, and Hera. According to one of the ancient myths of the birth of Zeus, Cronus, having heard the prophecy that he might be dethroned by one of his children, swallowed them as they were born. Upon the birth of Zeus, Rhea wrapped a stone in swaddling clothes for Cronus to swallow and concealed the infant god in Crete, where he was fed on the milk of the goat Amalthaea and reared by nymphs. When Zeus grew to maturity, he forced Cronus to regergitate the other children, who were eager to take vengeance on their father. In the war that followed, the Titans fought on the side of Cronus, but Zeus and the other gods were successful, and the Titans were banished to Tartarus.... Free Essays on Mythology Free Essays on Mythology Some of the world’s most compelling relationships have their roots in classical mythology. Many different religions have stories or ideals that have similarities to the relationships seen in ancient Greek mythology. From the interaction of mortals and gods we see how different writers viewed religion, family, and society. More specifically we see how the gods influence the way of life of a mortal. In Homer’s Odyssey there are many instances where the gods help mortals through their struggles. However, at the same time, there are situations when gods use their power to all but destroy the lives of the mortals who have displeased them. One of the most intriguing relationships between god and mortal is that of Athena and Odysseus. There are many times when Athena gives Odysseus the helping hand needed to succeed in his ventures to return to Ithaca. The roles that the gods play in the Homeric world compared with Euripides and Sophocles have great similarities as we ll as differences. Looking at how Athena seems to take care of Odysseus, it seems that the gods, perhaps only Athena, tend to take a liking to mortals occasionally. You could draw the conclusion that Athena seems to like Odysseus’ family. She shows almost as much interest in Telemachos as she does Odysseus. â€Å"Likening herself to Mentor in form and in voice: â€Å"Telemachos, already your well-greaved companions are seated at the oars awaiting your urging. Let us go, so that we may not long delay from the journey.† (Book II, pg 26, lines 401-404) In this passage Athena has taken the form of Mentor, a good companion of Odysseus, and has instructed Telemachos â€Å"to go in a ship onto the murky sea to learn of the return of my father who is gone so long.† (Book II, pg 23, lines 262-263) Athena then says, â€Å"†¦hereafter you will not be a coward or senseless. If there is really instilled in you the good might of your father and you are as he was to achieve... Free Essays on Mythology Greek mythology was fully developed by about the 8th century BC. As the Greek people began to realize that the sun, moon and stars followed certain rhythms with The seasons, they thought that something not beast nor human had the power. That is were the idea of gods came in. Ancient Greeks believed that the gods, who resembled Humans lived on Mount Olympus, where they had their own little society. Individual Gods were part of three main parts of the world- the sky or heaven, the sea, and the Earth. The 12 chief gods were Zeus was the god of the sky and ruler of the Olympian gods. He was considered the father of the gods, and of mortals, although he did not create either; he was their father in the sense of being the ruler both of the Olympian gods and of the human race. He was the rain god, and the cloud gatherer, his wepon was the terrible thunderbolt. His breastplate was the aegis, his bird the eagle, his tree the oak. Zeus was the youngest son of the Titans, Cronus and Rhea, and the brother of the Poseidon, Hades, Hestia, Demeter, and Hera. According to one of the ancient myths of the birth of Zeus, Cronus, having heard the prophecy that he might be dethroned by one of his children, swallowed them as they were born. Upon the birth of Zeus, Rhea wrapped a stone in swaddling clothes for Cronus to swallow and concealed the infant god in Crete, where he was fed on the milk of the goat Amalthaea and reared by nymphs. When Zeus grew to maturity, he forced Cronus to regergitate the other children, who were eager to take vengeance on their father. In the war that followed, the Titans fought on the side of Cronus, but Zeus and the other gods were successful, and the Titans were banished to Tartarus.... Free Essays on Mythology Greek Mythology Greek Mythology, beliefs and ritual observances of the ancient Greeks, who became the first Western civilization about 2000 BC. It consists mainly of a body of diverse stories and legends about a variety of gods. Greek mythology had become fully developed by about the 700s BC. Three classic collections of myths-Theogony by the poet Hesiod and the Iliad and the Odyssey by the poet Homer-appeared at about that time. Greek mythology has several distinguishing characteristics. The Greek gods resembled humans in form and showed human feelings. Unlike ancient religions such as Hinduism or Judaism, Greek mythology did not involve special revelations or spiritual teachings. It also varied widely in practice and belief, with no formal structure, such as a church government, and no written code, such as a sacred book. Principal Gods The Greeks believed that the gods chose Mount Olympus, in a region of Greece called Thessaly, as their home. On Olympus, the gods formed a society that ranked them in terms of authority and powers. However, the gods could roam freely, and individual gods became associated with three main domains-the sky or heaven, the sea, and earth. The 12 chief gods, usually called the Olympians, were Zeus, Hera, Hephaestus, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Ares, Aphrodite, Hestia, Hermes, Demeter, and Poseidon. Zeus was the head of the gods, and the spiritual father of gods and people. His wife, Hera, was the queen of heaven and the guardian of marriage. Other gods associated with heaven were Hephaestus, god of fire and metalworkers; Athena, goddess of wisdom and war; and Apollo, god of light, poetry, and music. Artemis, goddess of wildlife and the moon; Ares, god of war; and Aphrodite, goddess of love, were other gods of heaven. They were joined by Hestia, goddess of the hearth; and Hermes, messenger of the gods and ruler of science and invention. Poseidon was the ruler of the sea who, with his wife Amphitrite, led a g... Free Essays on Mythology Myths throughout history have been in existence since ancient times and still play a vital role in today’s society. Acting as basis of how to live one’s life and a guide towards beneficial pathways, myths compile many elements into a story that teaches a lesson and/or instills fear in one’s mind to avoid making immoral decisions. Born on the frontier of Ancient Greece philosophy these fictitious accounts of legendary heros and mystical lands were first established into the culture of the Greek way of life. Used to explain the Gods, demigods, and explanations of the universe, myths provide a tangible outlet that the mind is left to ponder. Mysteriously disappearing into the Atlantic Ocean, the island of Atlantis has been the subject matter of its own mythological story for many years. As told by Plato, the story starts when the Gods divided the earth into separate parts, each taking control of their deserved piece.(Hefner, â€Å"Atlantis the Myth†) Poseidon gained control of what was to be Atlantis. Soon after, he fell in love with a mortal women named Cleito with whom he would have ten sons with. He made his first born son the first king of Atlantis and his other sons became princes that would rule separate portions of the island. Saying that Atlantis was prosperous beyond all expectations did not prove to be an understatement. Every citizen was educated, the landscape was made up of green grassy meadows and pristine lakes, and there was not to many conflicts between the inhabitants. New inventions and ideas of how to make life easier came about as they used their intelligence to the fullest extent. I t was what we would call a Utopia. Poseidon set rules and laws that were to be followed by the future rulers and leaders of this fruitful kingdom. As long as the rules and regulations were met the state of the island showed no signs of corruption. However, as time went on and the leaders strayed from the set rules of P...

Friday, November 22, 2019

Business Opportunity Identification Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Business Opportunity Identification - Essay Example From this discussion it is clear that  innovation forms the basis of any business opportunity. There are various factors that need to be analyzed before implementing an innovative idea. UK market is the main focus in this study due to its economic stability. Any new business start up should encompass such product or services that can cater hidden customer demand. Affordability or purchasing power is another aspect that plays a vital role while designing a new business plan. The business opportunity which has been identified is in the wrist watch sector. Watches are highly in demand in consumer market and there is more inclination towards branded items. Branded watches are usually preferred by customers due to its unique designs that are inimitable. In this segment there lies high opportunity in context of offering unique design wrist watches to upper middle and lower middle segment.This report outlines that the highly competitive UK market has different segments and middle income g roup shall initiate required profit margins for the retail company. Wrist watches are mostly preferred by adults and youth, and this is the business opportunity for the retail company to be launched.  An entrepreneur starting a new business needs to take into consideration wide array of factors. These factors are related to financial and operational aspects of the new start up business. Financial factor is a major component during designing a new business.

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Modern Times Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Modern Times - Essay Example Nevertheless, the final film of the series seems to be the most overtly political and inevitably then is the most controversial. Although chock-full of the brand of slapstick, physical humor which has become automatically associated with Chaplin’s acting career, Modern Times is often interpreted to be a representation of Chaplin’s own political affiliations and associations with the Left. However, certain aspects of the film make it quite apparent that Leftist politics hold no monopoly on its figurative content. The aforementioned fans of Chaplin who truly cherish his work cannot help but see through the depictions of poverty and suffering in the film, and see the Tramp urging the Gamin â€Å"to keep smiling†, and to see him relying upon his own values and skills to build a life for himself—ideals that are consistent with capitalism and the American dream. Even before the film starts, any attempt on the part of witch-hunters to tie Chaplin to the Left and condemn Modern Times as hidden socialist propaganda is, all at once, defeated.After the opening credits, superimposed on a clock that symbolizes the tyranny of mechanistic time, the words read: â€Å"‘Modern Times.’ A story of industry, of individual enterprise—humanity crusading in the pursuit of happiness.† Expressing the film’s entire thematic content in only a few brief words, such phrases as â€Å"individual enterprise† and â€Å"pursuit of happiness† give attention not to a Leftist political cause in the context of a Depression

Monday, November 18, 2019

Art Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 750 words - 15

Art - Essay Example Thus, even if they might have been made for different purposes, at least they had similar essences because it is the same Egyptians who were using it as an important sculpture in their society. Khafre Enthroned refers to funerary statue of Pharaoh Khafre who is believed to have ruled Egypt between the years 2520 and 2570. Currently, it is exhibited in the Museum in Cairo, Egypt. It was made using gneiss rock which is closely related to diorite rocks, a valuable, dark extremely hard material that was mined 4000 miles at the royal quarries along the River Nile. The use of such a precious material in the production of this statue was necessary because it equated Khafre’s influences and authority as an Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh. This statue played a very significant role in Egypt: acting as Pharaoh Ka’s sub statue; and as a sign of peace. This explains why it still plays a significant role in the life of the Egyptians today. Great Sphinx of Giza (Sphinx) which can be literally translated as the father of the dead or a terrifying one is a statue located in Giza Plateau, at the banks of River Nile, Egypt. It was made between the years c. 2558–2532Â  BC during the time when Egypt was under the leadership of Pharaoh Khafra. Just like Khafre Enthroned, this statue has a significant role to play in the lives of the Egyptians. However, the 241Â  ft long, 63Â  ft wide, and 66.34Â  ft high statue depicts an image of a mystical creature which has got a human head and a lion’s body. Thus, it stands as the largest monolithic statue in the entire globe. For this reason, it has had different interpretations especially in the contemporary society. Whereas the London Imperial College’s Surgeon Huan Ashrafian associates it to a depiction of a person suffering from a disease in disease with lion-like conditions, it has been linked to the solar worship that was so prominent amongst the Ancient Egy ptians. This is so because the image of lion has been synonymous with the

Saturday, November 16, 2019

Internationalization

Internationalization 1. Preface This paper has been written for the course Societal Developments Institutions. The topic of this paper, knowledge sharing in virtual teams, is primarily focused on the Internationalization aspect of this course. But also aspects from other courses of the Master of Organizational Sciences (Msc OS), like Complexity within Organizations and Organizational Dynamics, are represented in this paper. Virtual teams and especially the knowledge sharing within such a team seemed very interesting to me. The broad link of this topic with the different courses of Msc OS was attractive to me, but also the growth in popularity of using this kind of the teams in nowadays business motivated me into doing this research. I hope this inquiry about knowledge sharing in virtual teams can facilitate virtual teams in knowing the challenges ahead, and help virtual team managers and -designers in benefit better from the advantages of virtual teams. Furthermore, after reading this paper I hope you, as reader, are (even more) inspired about the possibilities of working with virtual teams in ‘the collaboration economy. Key concepts: Internationalization, globalization, virtual teams, knowledge sharing. 2. Introduction In todays society people have adopted media technologies, such as e-mail, chat, and videoconferencing, that enable them to ‘go virtual and communicate with other individuals from all over the world. Currently, there are 1,733,993,741 internet users around the world (Internet world Stats, 2009). Because of those technological innovations it is possible to collaborate with other people regardless there geographical position. The last couple of years, next to those technological developments, two other mechanisms developed in a historical way globalization and demography. Tapscott and Williams argued in their book Wikinomics (2006): The three mechanisms: technology, globalization and demography are influencing the world towards a new economy, the collaboration economy. Emerging globalization demands and facilitates new forms of economic collaboration and provides all businesses who are seeking for unique talents to fix their problems with talented employees from over the whole world. And demographically there is also a shift. A new generation, bigger than the babyboom generation, the internet generation will dominate the 21ste century because of her demographical presence. This generation has grown up with internet and will utilize this technology in an efficient way and will change the status-quo in a radical way. Doing business and the way of collaborating in business will also change. Old monolithic multinationals which creates added value in a closed hieratically structure is quickly outdated. Successful businesses nowadays need open and porous bo rders and should compete using knowledge, resources and capacities outside the organization. Even heavy, capital intensive production industries will not be an exception. Also Ilinitch, DAveni Lewin (1996) addressed those changes; by opening their special issue on new organizational forms and hyper-competitive environments by nothing that, organizations are facing strong forces of change: globalization, demographic shifts, advances in technology, and the demassification of society. In response to those changes and shifts organizational forms are proliferating. One such new organizational form is found in virtual teams, sometimes called distributed teams (Saunders Ahuja, 2006). Virtual teams are, in summary, technology mediated groups of people in various places around the world that work together on common tasks (Hardin, Fuller, and Davidson, 2007). Currently those virtual teams are widely embraced by modern businesses. A motive of this popularity is that they can help organizations adapt better. They may provide firms with advantages such as increased utilization of employee-time, round-the-clock workforce availability, and the opportunity to leverage knowledge and expertise around the world (Paul, Seetharaman, Samarah Mykytyn, 2004). Virtual teams bring organizations also some other advantage: reduced travel expenses, Co2 emissions, and less working time wasted on traveling (Lu, Watson-Manheim, House, Matzkevich, 2005). This increasing use of virtual teams is also noted by the Wall Street Journal. It reports that more than half of companies with more than 5000 employees use virtual teams (de Lisser, 1999) Also, a survey by the Gartner group found that more than 60% of professional employees work in virtual teams (Kanawattanachai Yoo, 2002). The growth in popularity of virtual teams inquires a summary of how to manage such a team in an efficient an effective way. Questions about what are important factors in managing successful global virtual teams needed to be answered. In this inquiry I will address those success factors in case of knowledge sharing in global virtual teams by answering the question: â€Å"What are success factors of knowledge sharing in virtual teams, with team members across the whole globe?†. This enquiry is focused on knowledge sharing in virtual teams because those dispersed teams in particular need to share knowledge, experience and insights in order to function successfully (Rosen, Furst, Blackburn, 2007). The aim of this paper is to facilitate virtual team managers and -designers with a summary of virtual team success factors in knowledge sharing by which they can benefit better from the advantages of virtual teams. Firstly I will address the theoretical background of virtual teams. In this theoretical background I will explain the organizational need for virtual teams, give a definition of virtual teams, deal with the key feature of virtual teams; the absence of face-to-face contact and I will give an insight in the knowledge sharing mechanism. In the second part of this paper I will focus on answering the research question based on earlier researches and literature references. This will be followed by a brief conclusion and recommendations of those success factors in knowledge sharing to facilitate virtual team managers and -designers with a practical summary. 3. Literature References Allen, T., (1977). Managing the flow of technology. Cambridge (MA): MIT Press. Armstrong,D.L., Cole, P. (1995). Managing distances and differences in geographically distributed work groups. In Jackson, S. Runderman, M. (Eds) Diversity in Work Teams: Research Paradigms for a Changing Workplace, p. 497-529. Bailey, D.E., Kurland, N.B., (2002). A review of telework research: findings, new directions an lessons for the study of modern work. Journal of Organizational Behavior, vol. 23, p. 383-400. Bell, B.S., Kozlowski, S.W.J., (2002). A typology of virtual teams: Implications for effective leadership. Group Organization Management, 27, p. 14-49. Boutellier, R., Gassmann, O., Macho, H., Roux, M., (1998). Management of dispersed product development teams: the role of information technologies. RD Management, 28(1), p. 13-25. Conrath, D., (1973). Communication environment and its relationship to organizational structure. Manage Science ,20, p. 586-603. Cummings, L.L., Bromiley, P., (1996). The organizational trust inventory (OTI): Development and validation. Trust in organizations: frontiers of theory and research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. de Lisser, E. (1999). Update on small business: Firms with virtual environments appeal to workers. 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Virtualness and knowledge in teams: managing the love triangle of organizations, individuals, and information technology. MIS Quarterly, vol. 27, p. 265-287. Gudykunst, W.B., (1997). Cultural variability in communication. Communication Research, 24, p. 327-348. Gullahorn, J., (1952). Distance and friendship as factors in the gross interaction matrix. Sociometry, 15, p. 123- 34. Hardin, A.M., Fuller, M.A., Davidson, R.M. (2007). I know I can, but can we?: Culture and efficacy beliefs in global virtual teams. Small Group Research, 38, 130-155. Hertel, G., Geiser, S., Konradt, U. (2005). Managing virtual teams: A review of current emperical research. Human Resource Management Review, 15, 69-95. Hertel, G., Konradt, U., Lehman, K., (2004). Staffing virtual teams: Development and validation of a web-based tool for selection and placement of virtual team members. Manuscript in preparation. Hollingshead, A.B., (1998). Retrieval processes in transactive memory systems. Journal of personality and social psychology, 74, p. 659-671. Ilinitch, A.Y., DAveni, R.A., Lewin A.y. (1996). New Organizational Forms and Strategies for managing in Hypercompetitive Environments. Organization Science, vol.7, p. 211-220. Internet World Stats (2009). Top 20 countries with highest number of internet users. Retrieved November 25th, 2009 from: http://www.internetworldstats.com/ Jarvenpaa, S., Leidner, D., (1999). Communication and trust in global virtual teams. Organization Science, 10, p. 791-15. Jehn, K.A., (1995). A multimethode examination of the benefits and determents of intragroup conflict. Administrative science quarterly, 40, p. 256-282. Kristof, A.L., Brown, K.G., Sims, H.P.Jr., Smith, K.A. (1995). The virtual team: A case study and inductive model. Advances in interdisciplinary studies of work teams, 2, 229-253. Lu, M., Watson-Manheim, M.,B., House, C.H., Matzkevich, T. (2005). Does distance matter? Bridging the discontinuities in distributed organizations. HICSS 2005. Levitt, B., March, J., (1988). Organizational Learning. Annual review of sociology, 14, p. 319-340 Kanawattanachai P., Yoo, Y. (2002). Dynamic nature of trust in virtual teams. Journal of strategic Infromation Systems, 11, 187-213. Kaywoth, T., Leidner, D., (2000). The global virtual manager: a prescription for success. European management journal, 18, p. 183-194. Kiesler, S., Sproull, L. (1992). Group decision making and communication technology. Organizational Behavior Human Decision Processes, 52, 96-123. Konradt, U., Schmook, R., Mà ¤lecke, M., (2000). Impacts of telework on individuals, organizations and families: a critical review. In C.L. Cooper and I.T. Robertson (Ed), International Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, vol. 15, p. 63-99, Wiley, Chichester. Kozlowski, S.W.J., Ilgen, D.R. (2006). Enhancing the effectiveness of work group and teams. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 7(3), 77-124 Lipnack, J., Stamps, J., (1997). 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